Prelims Quiz – Hunger and Nutrition

Find the answers and detailed explanations at the end of the post:

Q.1. Which of the following organistations is associated with the publication of the ‘Global Hunger Index’:

a. International Food Policy Research Institute

b. Heifer International

c. Food and Agricultural Organisation

d. None of the other three options


Q.2. Which of the following statements about the Global Nutrition Report (GNR) is/are true: (1) The Global Nutrition Report is released annually; (2) The World Health Organisation is associated with the GNR.

a. Only 1

b. Only 2

c. Both 1 and 2

d. Neither 1 nor 2


Q.3. Which of the following statements is/are true about the ‘National Family Health Surveys’ (NFHS): (1) The first NFHS was conducted in 1986-87; (2) The International Institute of Population Sciences is the nodal agency for providing guidance for the NFHS.

a. Only 1

b. Only 2

c. Both 1 and 2

d. Neither 1 nor 2


Q.4. Which of the following issues have been correctly paired with the percentage target of reduction as per the aims of the National Nutrition Mission: (1) Stunting: 4%; (2) Under-nutrition: 3%; (3) Anaemia: 2%; (4) Low birth weight: 4%.

a. None of the other options

b. Only 2 and 4

c. Only 1 and 4

d. Only 4


Q.5. The term ‘Mission 25 by 2022’ is recently seen in news with respect to:

a. Target to reduce stunting

b.  Target to reduce anaemia among adolescent girls

c. Target to reduced infant mortality rate

d. Target to reduce low birth weight


Answers and explanation-

Q. 1 – a. International Food Policy Research Institute

Q. 2 – c. Both 1 and 2

Q. 3 – b. Only 2

Q. 4 – a. None of the other options

Q.5. – a. Target to reduce stunting


The Global Hunger Index (GHI) is designed to comprehensively measure and track hunger globally and by country and region. Calculated each year by the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), the GHI highlights successes and failures in hunger reduction and provides insights into the drivers of hunger. By raising awareness and understanding of regional and country differences in hunger, the GHI aims to trigger actions to reduce hunger. The GHI combines 4 component indicators: 1) the proportion of the undernourished as a percentage of the population; 2) the proportion of children under the age of five suffering from wasting; 3) the proportion of children under the age of five suffering from stunting; 4) the mortality rate of children under the age of five. The Global Hunger Index (GHI) 2017, which ranks India at 100 out of 119 countries, with a low overall score of 31.4. The 2017 Global Hunger Index (GHI) report—the twelfth in an annual series—presents a multidimensional measure of national, regional, and global hunger. It shows that the world has made progress in reducing hunger since 2000, but that the progress has been uneven, and may now be threatened. This year’s report finds several countries have higher hunger levels in 2017 than they did in 2008, indicating that progress in reducing hunger over recent decades is reversing more recently in some places. Sources: International Food Policy Research Institute and Wikipedia. Also read: The Hindu.


The Global Nutrition Report is an independently produced annual stock-take of the state of the world’s nutrition. The Global Nutrition Report acts as a report card on the world’s nutrition—globally, regionally, and country by country—and on efforts to improve it. It assesses progress in meeting Global Nutrition Targets established by the World Health Assembly. The World Health Organization is a Global Nutrition Report Partner. Read more at: WHO and GNR.  


The National Family Health Survey (NFHS) is a large-scale, multi-round survey conducted in a representative sample of households throughout India. The NFHS is a collaborative project of the International Institute for Population Sciences (IIPS) Mumbai, India; ORC Macro, Calverton, Maryland, USA and the East-West Center, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA. The Ministry of Health and Family Welfare (MOHFW), Government of India, designated IIPS as the nodal agency, responsible for providing coordination and technical guidance for the NFHS. NFHS was funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) with supplementary support from United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF). The First National Family Health Survey was conducted in 1992-93. Source: National Family Health Survey.


The National Nutrition Mission (NNM) has been set up with a three year budget of Rs.9046.17 crore commencing from 2017-18. The NNM is a comprehensive approach towards raising nutrition level in the country on a war footing. It will comprise mapping of various Schemes contributing towards addressing malnutrition, including a very robust convergence mechanism, ICT based Real Time Monitoring system, incentivizing States/UTs for meeting the targets, incentivizing Anganwadi Workers (AWWs) for using IT based tools, eliminating registers used by AWWs, introducing measurement of height of children at the Anganwadi Centres (AWCs), Social Audits, setting-up Nutrition Resource Centres, involving masses through Jan Andolan for their participation on nutrition through various activities, among others. NNM targets to reduce stunting, under-nutrition, anemia (among young children, women and adolescent girls) and reduce low birth weight by 2%, 2%, 3% and 2% per annum respectively. Although the target to reduce Stunting is at least 2% p.a., Mission would strive to achieve reduction in Stunting from 38.4% (NFHS-4) to 25% by 2022 (Mission 25 by 2022). More than 10 crore people will be benefitted by this programme. All the States and districts will be covered in a phased manner i.e. 315 districts in 2017-18, 235 districts in 2018-19 and remaining districts in 2019-20. Source: PIB.


The National Nutrition Mission (NNM) has been set up with a three year budget of Rs.9046.17 crore commencing from 2017-18. The NNM is a comprehensive approach towards raising nutrition level in the country on a war footing. It will comprise mapping of various Schemes contributing towards addressing malnutrition, including a very robust convergence mechanism, ICT based Real Time Monitoring system, incentivizing States/UTs for meeting the targets, incentivizing Anganwadi Workers (AWWs) for using IT based tools, eliminating registers used by AWWs, introducing measurement of height of children at the Anganwadi Centres (AWCs), Social Audits, setting-up Nutrition Resource Centres, involving masses through Jan Andolan for their participation on nutrition through various activities, among others. NNM targets to reduce stunting, under-nutrition, anemia (among young children, women and adolescent girls) and reduce low birth weight by 2%, 2%, 3% and 2% per annum respectively. Although the target to reduce Stunting is at least 2% p.a., Mission would strive to achieve reduction in Stunting from 38.4% (NFHS-4) to 25% by 2022 (Mission 25 by 2022). More than 10 crore people will be benefitted by this programme. All the States and districts will be covered in a phased manner i.e. 315 districts in 2017-18, 235 districts in 2018-19 and remaining districts in 2019-20. Source: PIB.